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iHammock Relaxes And Recharges iPhones, Daiquiri Not Included

500x_hammock2_image2_01 iHammock Relaxes And Recharges iPhones, Daiquiri Not IncludedThe life of an iPhone is hard and you know it. After spending the day searching for 3G and running apps, the iHammock takes the edge off. This dock is actually a sweet idea. Too bad it’s just a rendering.

I love to take naps in hammocks, but that’s not why I think the iHammock is cool. The designer didn’t like the loud sound his iPhone made when vibrating on his desk so he thought to put it on something soft and elevated, like a hammock.

Its cocktail like-umbrella isn’t just to protect iPhone sunburn, it would work as a solar battery charger. That would jack the price up on this baby if it ever comes to market, but I’d be willing to pay for my phone to get a little R&R. [Petitinvention via iPhone Savior]

From Gizmodo: iPhone. Please read the complete article and let us know what you think below.

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iTwinge iPhone Keyboard Video Makes Me Cringe a Little Less

500x_itwinge iTwinge iPhone Keyboard Video Makes Me Cringe a Little LessSo you saw the iTwinge photos yesterday—that crazy physical keyboard with underside nubs for the iPhone’s touchscreen. It was easy to write off without seeing in action, so the company has sent around this hands-on video:

I’m slow as hell with my iPhone’s keyboard, and tend to only check emails, or send quick responses. I should probably just suck it up and get faster, but I’m curious if the $30 gizmo would help. Having to slide the holster on and off between emails (to use the screen again) could be a pain in the ass, though. Overall, a little less skeptical than I was, what about you? [itwinge]

From Gizmodo: iPhone. Please read the complete article and let us know what you think below.

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TuneWiki for iPhone Is Now Fully Armed and Operational

504x_tunewiki TuneWiki for iPhone Is Now Fully Armed and OperationalTuneWiki, one of our favorite mobile apps, is finally in the App Store in a non-gimped way with full access to your iTunes library (if you close it, it keeps playing through iPod even, like a fake background app).

You get subtitled lyrics (with translations), music maps showing where people are listening to what, internet radio, video search and you can “blip” what you’re listening to Twitter, Facebook or wherever kids hang out these days. It’s free, and definitely worth checking out. You can also grab it on Android or BlackBerry, if you’re so inclined. [iTunes]

From Gizmodo: iPhone. Please read the complete article and let us know what you think below.

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Apple May Be Blocking Push Notifications in Unlocked iPhones

iphone-push-no Apple May Be Blocking Push Notifications in Unlocked iPhonesWe don’t have confirmation on this beyond the word of a Czech-based developer who has tested it, but apparently Apple is blocking push notification services in unofficially unlocked iPhones. However, we have tested it and it works.

The developer says the following:

According to technical documentation, every Push application has to request the unique token from the Apple’s APNS servers to identify the device it’s running on. Thanks to that token, APNS servers always know which device is yours. The token can be understood as an IP address — the server has to know where to send the notification and for which application. APNS can also change your token regularly for higher reliability, so it’s critical that the application requests the token again on every start (or when enabling the Push feature) to replace the old one if new token is forced by APNS.

On any unlocked iPhone, the application requesting the token is stuck. APNS does not provide any response at all and the application can either cancel the request completely by automatic timeout or let user wait with the proggress bar forever. Either way, the user will never receive any Push message, because APNS has not provided the token.

However, I have an unlocked iPhone here in Spain and the push notification works perfectly—for example, with AIM. The catch, however, may be that my JesusPhone is using the official Movistar network, not a different one.

Whatever is the case, can Apple legally block these push services to people running iPhones on non-official networks? Would they be interested in doing this on purpose—since unlocked iPhones is such a small percentage of units? Or maybe it’s just a technical glitch?

According to the developer, it doesn’t matter: They argue that Apple has all the right to block services for these users—since they don’t use the official carrier—even while it’s hurting its ratings. However, they are asking Apple to provide a way to inform users with unlocked phones about why they don’t get push services using third-party applications. [Powerybase via AppAdvice via 9to5]

From Gizmodo: iPhone. Please read the complete article and let us know what you think below.

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The White iPhone 3GS Is Rare Like a Unicorn

whiteiphonegone The White iPhone 3GS Is Rare Like a UnicornIt doesn’t surprise me that the white iPhone 3GS is apparently selling out everywhere, for several reasons.

• Apple’s likely making far fewer of them than the way more popular black iPhone.

• Notice that’s the cheaper 16GB model that’s completely sold out here—there are still 32GB models, for obvious reasons (price).

• When I found out I’d have to enslave several small children to AT&T to “upgrade” to a 3GS, I was planning on going white to have something different from my old iPhone 3G, which is black. (Okay, and maybe to have something a little different from most other people.) My guess is that it’s not an uncommon instinct, and that many people buying the white iPhone 3GS already had an iPhone 3G, or are consciously trying to stand out, as flawed, yes, as that notion may be.

• Or maybe they’ve all just turned into different colors. [Apple 2.0]

From Gizmodo: iPhone. Please read the complete article and let us know what you think below.

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Amazon Won’t Let Mobile Apps Use Its Product Info Anymore

deliciouslibrary Amazon Wont Let Mobile Apps Use Its Product Info AnymoreWeird play by Amazon—they’ve changed their Product Advertising API so that mobile apps like Delicious Library, which pull product info from it, can’t use it. Its developers were forced to pull it from the App Store.

Delicious Library developer Wil Shipley did ask for permission, but Amazon told him to yank they app or they’d shut him down themselves. So if you never got around to grabbing it, you’re out of luck. And it is specifically on the mobile side that they’re being prickly:

You will not, without our express prior written approval requested via this link , use any Product Advertising Content on or in connection with any site or application designed or intended for use with a mobile phone or other handheld device.

The only rational explanation—insofar as there is one here—is that they want people to use Amazon’s own mobile apps to access their data and check out products, which, in a way, goes along how they’re pushing Kindle as software on multiple platforms. (Software is important to them now, rather than being a dumb data provider, in other words.) I guess they think you’re more likely to buy stuff from Amazon while you’re poking around in their apps. [Alan Quatermain via Twitter via TechCrunch]

From Gizmodo: iPhone. Please read the complete article and let us know what you think below.

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The Cost of Buying Every iPhone App: $144,326.06

ap2 The Cost of Buying Every iPhone App: $144,326.06Just in case you felt compelled to assemble a collection of every push-to-fart program out there, BustedLoop calculates the price of purchasing all 55,732 available iPhone apps to be $144,326.06. What, Apple, no volume discount? [BustedLoop via Forbes/textually]

From Gizmodo: iPhone. Please read the complete article and let us know what you think below.

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External iPhone Mic Supposedly Gets 10x Better Audio ‘Reception’

brandomic External iPhone Mic Supposedly Gets 10x Better Audio ReceptionBrando’s claiming 10x better audio reception on this external, swivelable iPhone microphone. Even if it doesn’t get 10x better reception, it should get 2x better reception, which is worth $14 for most people. [Brando via Dvice]

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Fake: More Possible iPhone 3G 2009 Shots Reveal Video Chat

33omez6-500x350 Fake: More Possible iPhone 3G 2009 Shots Reveal Video ChatFrom the same source as this possible leak comes a few shots of what could be video chat on the iPhone. Who knows. UPDATE: This image is fake.

But, supposing it’s real, it’s interesting to note that it appears to be on Wi-Fi. It’s possible that it’s like Skype and SlingPlayer and only work over Wi-Fi. On the other hand, we can’t make that conclusion yet, but since video chat is a “data” service, it makes sense that it goes over whatever “data” service you’re currently on (Wi-Fi or 3G). And it may be a simple photoshop anyway—just load and image, then add the green light in Photoshop (as shown here). In any case, remember to check out our liveblog on Monday to see the real iPhone reveal. [Nowhereelsethanks Brendan]

From Gizmodo: iPhone. Please read the complete article and let us know what you think below.

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Is This Really the iPhone 3G 2009?

match Is This Really the iPhone 3G 2009?Most of the rumors and speculation say that there wasn’t going to be video-conferencing in the new iPhone 3G 2009. However, a last-minute batch of images point to the contrary. Or do they? Update

In the image above, the iPhone on the left—published by a french blog—looks like it still has its factory plastic cover. You can see that the speaker grill has been moved up, and that there’s a spot that may be the front-facing camera. Updated

The one on the right could be the new iPhone 3G 2009′s bezel according to a Chinese original parts wholesaler. It has the speaker in the same location, but there are significant differences on the size of that opening. Indeed, there seems to be a good match in size. The opening on the left seems to be a little irregular, but it could be an effect of the lighting and the picture’s bad quality.

Of course, both images could be false but assuming one may be the real thing, there seems to be a mismatch. but they seem to match.

touchvssomething_01 Is This Really the iPhone 3G 2009?

Update: the two images above are fake.

Here you have the two pictures that appeared in a second post in the same french site. There is clearly a difference between the two of them: The green lights—which indicate that the front-facing camera is working—are clearly on different places.

But that is not all. There are a lot more inconsistencies in these images than that. When you pass both through the Shadows and Lighting filter in Photoshop CS4, you can see that other things seem to be wrong: First, the iPhone on the left seems to have a chrome rim. On the right, the iPhone’s rim looks like the rim of the iPod touch. On the first one, the videoconferencing itself can be easily faked by loading a picture and adding the green light later. On the second one, it doesn’t make much sense to allow to record video from the front-facing camera when there’s no clear way in the interface to select the camera you want to use.

In any case, the bottom line here is that there seems to be a lot of inconsistencies in these images. To the point that all of them may be fake (and indeed they are fake.)

Tune in to discover the real iPhone 3G 2009 in our WWDC 2009 liveblog, this monday, June 8.

From Gizmodo: iPhone. Please read the complete article and let us know what you think below.

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